Videos Watch science in action and presentations on the hottest topics in autism.
Previous Articles

Mighty magnet promises to render human brain in intricate detail

by  /  26 April 2019

A new magnetic resonance imaging machine has the power to reveal the brain’s structure and activity at unprecedented resolution.

For people with alexithymia, emotions are a mystery

by ,  /  22 February 2019

One in 10 people struggle to recognize their emotions. New research suggests a vital link between our ability to sense our physical bodies and knowing how we feel.

Brain’s prefrontal cortex conducts symphony of social players

by  /  20 February 2019

A brain region that orchestrates responses to social cues and aids decision-making may be off tempo in autism.

Stabilizing head mold leads to sharper brain images

by  /  15 February 2019

A customizable Styrofoam mold minimizes head movements during brain scans, enabling researchers to produce clearer images.

Imaging technique paints neuronal fibers in dazzling colors

by  /  18 January 2019

A multicolor labeling method stains neurons brightly enough to reveal the thin connections between individual cells.

New method exposes structures inside ‘rainbow’ of brain cells

by  /  4 January 2019

Molecules from alpacas may enable scientists to identify cell types in the brain while also revealing their interior structures.

Pitch your thesis: Big questions drive autism research

21 December 2018

Early-career autism researchers record ‘elevator pitches’ of their projects.

How to design spaces for people with autism

by  /  11 December 2018

Architects are working with schools to create welcoming, versatile spaces for students on the spectrum.

Microscope tracks cells in maturing mouse embryos

by  /  5 December 2018

A new microscope creates images of a mouse embryo as it grows from a ball of about 100 cells into a structure with a primitive heart and brain.

Monkey with mutation in top autism gene shows social problems

by  /  14 November 2018

The first monkey with a mutation in SHANK3, a top autism gene, is nearly 3; it spends its days circling its cage rather than interacting with other monkeys.