Author

Emily Willingham

Science writer, Spectrum

Emily writes frequently about autism and related issues, and her work has appeared in print or online at Discover, New York Times, Slate, Washington Post, San Francisco Chronicle, and others. Emily has a B.A. in English with minors in German and History and a Ph.D. in biological sciences, both from The University of Texas at Austin. She also completed postdoctoral work at the University of California, San Francisco and has taught graduate and undergraduate biology for many years.

May 2018
Week of MayMay
14th
2018
News / Spotted

Cerebral palsy connection; misleading expressions; multiple maladies and more

by  /  18 May 2018

New evidence links autism and cerebral palsy at the genetic level, facial expressions tend to mislead, and many health conditions accompany autism.

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Week of MayMay
7th
2018
News / Spotted

Dividing autism; novel messengers; million-dollar mark and more

by  /  11 May 2018

A researcher proposes splitting autism into subtypes, mitochondria make neurotransmitters, and highly successful grantees may face a funding cap.

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Week of AprilApr
30th
2018
News / Spotted

Predictive brain waves; spotting liars; pet peeve and more

by  /  4 May 2018

Brain waves in infancy forecast autism, people with more autism features have trouble detecting lies, and veterinarians battle claims that vaccines cause autism in dogs.

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April 2018
Week of AprilApr
23rd
2018
News / Spotted

New journal; organoid ethics; acetaminophen association and more

by  /  27 April 2018

A journal covering autism in adulthood makes its debut, researchers call for an ethical framework for human organoid studies, and the association between acetaminophen and autism risk comes under scrutiny.

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Week of AprilApr
16th
2018
News / Spotted

Randomized trial repository; Beijing brain center; global science march and more

by  /  20 April 2018

Scientists release a list of all randomized controlled trials of autism treatments, China establishes a brain center for an ambitious new project, and people around the world march for science again.

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Week of AprilApr
9th
2018
News / Spotted

Fragile X checklist; France plays catch-up; bar-coded neurons and more

by  /  13 April 2018

A checklist for fragile X syndrome could help identify people with the condition in low-resource settings, France unveils a plan for early diagnosis and education of children with autism, and virally inserted ‘bar codes’ help track individual neurons.

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Week of AprilApr
2nd
2018
News / Spotted

Budget boom; CRISPR retraction; basketball benefit and more

by  /  6 April 2018

With one exception, budget allocations are booming for U.S. science agencies, a CRISPR paper that shook faith has been retracted, and professional basketball teams build sensory rooms for fans on the spectrum.

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March 2018
Week of MarchMar
26th
2018
News / Spotted

Late-life diagnosis; narrated brain stimulation; microglia movie and more

by  /  30 March 2018

Women describe relief at finally learning they have autism, a man with epilepsy narrates during stimulation of his brain, and the brain’s immune cells are caught on film nibbling at neuronal connections.

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Week of MarchMar
19th
2018
News / Spotted

Activists arrested; poop cult; ‘landmark’ movie and more

by  /  23 March 2018

Activists are arrested while protesting the use of electroshock devices, a Facebook group claims cabbage slurry can prevent autism, and a movie features romance — and actors — on the spectrum.

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Week of MarchMar
12th
2018
News / Spotted

Early theory of mind; bizarre book defense; fake news and more

by  /  16 March 2018

Theory of mind develops surprisingly early, a book publisher doubles down in defense of a controversial author, and false vaccine news gets a correction.

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