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Tag: ANK2

May 2021
Neurons in red and green
News

‘Neurons on a chip’ reveal patterns across autism-linked conditions

by  /  7 May 2021

Activity patterns of neuronal networks link different genetic subtypes of autism that have similar traits, according to new unpublished research.

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February 2021
News

Mutations in frogs point to autism genes’ shared role in neurogenesis

by  /  10 February 2021

Mutations in any of 10 autism-linked genes in frogs lead to the same overabundance of brain cells that develop into neurons; the sex hormone estrogen lowers this excess.

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October 2020
Gut neurons and glia (red, green) are fragile and interwoven with other cells (blue) in the colon, making them tricky to isolate.
News / Toolbox

Cell maps reveal diversity of neurons in gut

by  /  21 October 2020

An atlas that details gene expression in neurons and other cells from the intestines of mice and people may help to elucidate the link between gut problems and autism.

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August 2019
News

Mice reveal how top autism gene may disrupt brain structure

by  /  26 August 2019

Mutations in an autism gene called ANK2 may alter brain wiring by causing the growth of excess neuronal connections.

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October 2018
A boy toddler learns to walk with an adult holding his hands.
News

Some ‘autism genes’ show stronger ties to related conditions

by  /  17 October 2018

The largest autism sequencing study to date implicates 99 genes in the condition — but nearly half have a tighter link to intellectual disability or developmental delay.

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January 2018
three mice with one in the spotlight
News

‘Retired’ mice find new life as top models for autism

by  /  25 January 2018

As the list of autism candidate genes grows, some mouse models of the genes turn up in long-forgotten studies.

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February 2017
human brain showing the corpus callosum highlighted
News

Brain’s bridge could yield clues to faulty wiring in autism

by  /  27 February 2017

Decoding distortions in the brain’s largest nerve tract could lay bare basic problems with long-range neural connections in autism.

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